SOCIETY AND MANNERS IN EARLY NINETEENTH-CENTURY IRELAND, by John Gamble — edited and introduced by Breandán Mac Suibhne (pdf only)

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SOCIETY AND MANNERS IN EARLY NINETEENTH-CENTURY IRELAND, by John Gamble — edited and introduced by Breandán Mac Suibhne (pdf only)

10.00

An annotated edition of the travel-writing of Dr. John Gamble (1770–1831).

The travelogues of John Gamble are highly regarded for their insight into society, manners and politics in Ulster—he visited all nine counties— between the 1798 Rising and the Great Famine.

This edition—approx. 400,000 words, c. 800 pages—has been extensively annotated and indexed by Dr. Breandán Mac Suibhne.

 

Published by Field Day in association with the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame.

Field Day Editions Series

LXXXII + 718 PAGES; 3 MAPS

ISBN 978-0-946755-43-1

 

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A native of Strabane, John Gamble graduated MD from Edinburgh in 1793 before serving as a surgeon in the British army. In the early 1800s he settled in London, where he moved in literary and theatrical circles; he himself produced several works of fiction and three travelogues recounting trips home to Strabane in 1810, 1812 and 1818, when he returned to stay. The travelogues of John Gamble  are highly regarded for their insight into society, manners and politics in Ulster—he visited all nine counties— between the 1798 Rising and the Great Famine. This book promises to be a widely read source for the history of early nineteenth-century Ireland, most especially Ulster.

 

 SAMPLE PAGES HERE

1 review for SOCIETY AND MANNERS IN EARLY NINETEENTH-CENTURY IRELAND, by John Gamble — edited and introduced by Breandán Mac Suibhne (pdf only)

  1. ‘John Gamble’s accounts of trips home to Ireland in 1810, 1812 and 1818 confounded British critics as much for what he said as how he said it. His deftly re-created encounters with people of all ranks, and his exposition of their experiences and expectations, laid bare the ‘diseased state of public feeling’ in a country that, by many of his readers’ lights, should have been quietly enjoying the blessings of union with Great Britain. … This splendid edition is an immense resource for all students of society and culture in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Ireland.’

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